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EYE AM! Official Trailer (2017) featuring Waka Flocka Flame, Lou Williams, Beyonce Knowles-Carter and MORE. A Turtlegang film co-produced by Jason Williams. 🎥💙🐢#maketurtleislandgreatagain #visionvoicevote #indigenous #makeart4artist #wakaflocka #beyonce #LouWilliams #turtlegang #turtlegangnyc #culture #urbanindian #WeThePeople

Posted by Maketurtleislandgreatagain on Wednesday, October 11, 2017

 

EYE AM! Trailer (2017) featuring Waka Flocka Flame, Lou Williams, Beyonce Knowles-Carter and MORE.

A Turtlegang film co-produced by Jason Williams.

Waka Flocka Flame goes on the record in regards to his lineage. He lets the world know he is Native American. Waka is not the only celebrity and or athlete who has expressed this truth. There are many others who have spoken their truth. Check out the upcoming short documentary “Eye Am” which will shed more light to this very subject.

A Turtlegang film co-produced by Jason Williams.

The Ramapough and decolonization – Anthony Van Dunk

The job of Patahmawiikan is to get indigenous people in touch with their language their traditions, and basic knowledge through, of course, traditional means. And when I say traditional means, I mean like story-telling, but, using of course technology because we are here in the 21rst century. A lot of my issues basically cover everything. Of course decolonization is sort of the overcoat that deals with all our issues. Because of that, you’ve lost religion, you’ve lost language, you’ve lost culture. You’ve basically lost many people’s souls. And there are more examples of what colonization has done, than the idea of not being colonized.

So with colonization, if you just take examples with Native American tribes, you have them kicking out members of their tribe so they can make a little more money. They have amazing amounts of jealousy. So with us, it’s that we have two definitions for the word love. We’ve got colonial love and we’ve got indigenous love. Colonial love is just ‘me’. ‘I love me, and its all for me.’ Where indigenous love is, we’re here for our brothers and sisters, so my job is to make you prosper, your job is to make them prosper, and it continues to roll, because indigenous love is all about true, focused love.

Now, I’m from the Ramapough mountain Indians, and of course we’ve been in the center of colonization since the 1600s, a little over 500 years. So we’re very good at being colonized. And its an amazingly hard and difficult thing to come out of. We can sort of talk about it and we can just try on a individual basis to come out of it, but there’s this huge pull over us. And it looks like MTV. And it looks like Facebook. And it looks like suicide for teenagers, suicide for adults. And its throughout the idea that colonial love has taught you to self hate. And we have to find a way to bring that love out, and support.

So we have a series of programs we’re coming out with, and one of them is called the Simbley language series. So for example, our first book is simply Munsee. We hand out these books to teach people the language of Munsee. And it goes into tradition, with the illustrations you see traditions, and basic knowledge. And we’re hoping to be able to do that language for all indigenous people, whether its Sami people or Papua New Guinea, or of course, the Caribbean and the Tainos and all of the American tribes in the United States and Canada. So that’s one idea. And we have an idea of a lending library, where we’ll put out one of those portable libraries and just throw books at it and have people just circulate that. Just sort of opening scope, while still trying to hone in on traditions that just flourish the spirit.

The Ramapough and decolonization – Anthony Van Dunk The job of Patahmawiikan is to get indigenous people in touch with their language their traditions, and basic knowledge through, of course, traditional means. And when I say traditional means, I mean like story-telling, but, using of course technology because we are here in the 21rst century. A lot of my issues basically cover everything. Of course decolonization is sort of the overcoat that deals with all our issues. Because of that, you’ve lost religion, you’ve lost language, you’ve lost culture. You’ve basically lost many people’s souls. And there are more examples of what colonization has done, than the idea of not being colonized. So with colonization, if you just take examples with Native American tribes, you have them kicking out members of their tribe so they can make a little more money. They have amazing amounts of jealousy. So with us, it’s that we have two definitions for the word love. We’ve got colonial love and we’ve got indigenous love. Colonial love is just ‘me’. ‘I love me, and its all for me.’ Where indigenous love is, we’re here for our brothers and sisters, so my job is to make you prosper, your job is to make them prosper, and it continues to roll, because indigenous love is all about true, focused love. Now, I’m from the Ramapough mountain Indians, and of course we’ve been in the center of colonization since the 1600s, a little over 500 years. So we’re very good at being colonized. And its an amazingly hard and difficult thing to come out of. We can sort of talk about it and we can just try on a individual basis to come out of it, but there’s this huge pull over us. And it looks like MTV. And it looks like Facebook. And it looks like suicide for teenagers, suicide for adults. And its throughout the idea that colonial love has taught you to self hate. And we have to find a way to bring that love out, and support. So we have a series of programs we’re coming out with, and one of them is called the Simbley language series. So for example, our first book is simply Munsee. We hand out these books to teach people the language of Munsee. And it goes into tradition, with the illustrations you see traditions, and basic knowledge. And we’re hoping to be able to do that language for all indigenous people, whether its Sami people or Papua New Guinea, or of course, the Caribbean and the Tainos and all of the American tribes in the United States and Canada. So that’s one idea. And we have an idea of a lending library, where we’ll put out one of those portable libraries and just throw books at it and have people just circulate that. Just sort of opening scope, while still trying to hone in on traditions that just flourish the spirit.

Posted by Maketurtleislandgreatagain on Saturday, October 14, 2017

 

AMERICAN NATIVE Coming soon to a theatre near you

Make Turtle Island GREAT Again!! Go hit that LIKE button…Maketurtleislandgreatagain

Posted by Shayla Branham on Saturday, October 14, 2017

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#MTIGA: a SIT DOWN WITH NOBLE PA

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NJ Superior Court Rules Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape are Sovereign Tribe

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The Health Effects of Leaving Religion

Migrants and refugees flooding into Europe have presented European leaders and policymakers with their greatest challenge since the debt crisis. The International Organization for...
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“STEAL AWAY, STEAL AWAY…” New Jersey and the UGRR…

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MUST READ

Smithsonian Home

National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center

americanindian.si.edu

The New York museum presents the lifeways and traditions of Native people throughout the hemisphere through an active schedule of exhibitions, family programs, performances, and film screenings.

Highlights The Diker Pavilion of Native Arts and Cultures, daily film screenings, Resource Center and numerous public programs throughout the year

Hours
10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily; Thursdays until 8 p.m.
Closed December 25

Admission is FREE

Information
212-514-3700 (tape)

Accessibility

Location
Alexander Hamilton
U.S. Custom House
One Bowling Green
New York, NY

See Map »

Subway
4 and 5 trains to Bowling Green.

Bus
M5, M15, and M20

Parking
There is no parking at the museum. Parking is limited to street parking and commercial lots and garages.

STAR WARS THE LAST JEDI……

Posted by Norris Francis-Turtlegang Branham on Monday, October 9, 2017